Before I begin my most recent birth story, I need to give some background information about myself. I am a Neonatal Nurse Practitioner and work at the same hospital that I receive my OB care; therefore, I have a close professional relationship with my OB providers. I also have a uterine anomaly called a bicornuate uterus. This means that my uterus is divided into two sections. This was discovered at my 13 week nuchal transluceny ultrasound with my first pregnancy. The complications associated with this anomaly are cervical insufficiency, preterm labor, preterm delivery, growth restriction, and breech presentation. The risk of breech presentation is due to the limited space for the baby to turn. Because of this anomaly, I was followed very closely by the high risk OB and had approximately 13 ultrasounds with my first pregnancy. My son was born by vaginal delivery after spontaneous labor at 37 weeks and 2 days. At every ultrasound he was head down.

With my second pregnancy, my son was in breech presentation at every ultrasound. I really became concerned about this around 26-28 weeks, given the limited uterine space and that my first son was always head down and this time my son was always breech. Everyone (both medical and non-medical) tried to reassure me that “there’s plenty of time for him to flip.” It was at this point that I began my research on getting a baby to turn. I googled, youtubed, and read a lot of articles and blogs. I tried anything and everything to get my baby to turn, with no avail. At 34 weeks I had a discussion with my OB about attempting an external cephalic version (ECV); however, I am not a candidate for this procedure given my uterine anomaly. It finally started to sink in that I was going to have a c-section. My OB decided not to schedule me for a c-section, rather we would wait until I went into labor in order to give me every opportunity for the baby to flip.

Breech presentations include:

  • Frank Breech (Bottom down, feet are up by the head)
  • Footling breech (One or both feet are by down)
  • Complete breech (Bottom is down and legs are crossed. Imagine baby sitting Indian style.)

During a casual conversation one day at work with the high risk OB director, I expressed my concern for having a c-section and how much I did not want to have one. He agreed that I was not a candidate for an ECV and what I thought was jokingly, he said,“Well you could always do a breech vaginal, the only problem is I would have to be at your delivery, and that might be uncomfortable for you.” My response was that I would not have a breech vaginal because of the risks associated with it. That was the extent of our conversation. I did not have any conversation with my primary OB about a breech vaginal delivery.

So what are the risks with breech birth?
- Placenta being compressed
- Head getting stuck
- Some incidence of large limb fractures
Biggest issue currently is finding a provider who is experienced and educated in delivering a breech!

At 37 weeks I went to my routine OB appointment, and again had a discussion with my OB about a C-section, and again expressed my feelings and anxiety about it. She was very empathetic, but tried to reassure me that it wouldn’t be as bad as I thought and also gently brought me to reality that this baby would most likely not flip at this point. I was 1 cm dilated and 50% effaced at this appointment and not having any significant contractions.

The next morning, at 37 weeks and 1 day, I woke up with some intermittent cramping back pain. It wasn’t very painful, but it was certainly noticeable. Shortly thereafter I began to have some lower abdominal cramping similar to that of a period. I didn’t time the cramping but thought something might be happening given that it was intermittent and not a consistent discomfort. At this point I didn’t want to call my OB, because I knew she would want me to come in right away given the breech presentation and I didn’t want to have my husband come home from work and call my childcare if this wasn’t, “the real thing.” But, I did get my (almost) 2 year old set up with breakfast and hopped in the shower, did my hair and makeup, and got myself all ready “just in case” this was it. I packed the car with our bags before heading out with my son. Throughout the pregnancy I constantly thought about the, “last day” that it would be just, “us.” My son loves ice cream, so I wanted to take him out on an ice cream date. We got to the ice cream parlor a little before noon just to find out they didn’t open until noon. We went next door to the grocery store to kill a little time. By this point the cramping was occurring more frequently, but not necessarily with more intensity. I stopped in the bathroom on our way out and that’s when I had my bloody mucousy show. It finally sunk in at that time that I was in early labor. We got our ice cream and I just sat and enjoyed those last minutes with my son before my attention was going to have to be shared.

Megan the morning of Jacob's birth.

Megan the morning of Jacob's birth.

We got out to the car around 12:15 and I called my OB to report my symptoms. As I expected, she told me to come to the hospital to get evaluated. I called my husband who was working an hour away and my sister who was going to watch my son. By the time my husband got home and we got out the door it was around 1:30. We weren’t in the car more than 5 minutes when the intensity of my contractions increased and I was unable to talk during them. The ride to where we were meeting my sister was about 25 minutes. Just as we pulled up my water broke. I called my OB again to give her an update and that we were about 20 minutes away. By the time we arrived to the hospital I could barely think or talk due to the pain of the contractions which were now about a minute apart.

I was immediately taken into a room (the PACU was full) and my OB checked me and said I was 6 cms. There were so many medical professionals in my room working diligently to get me prepared for my c-section since I had progressed into labor so quickly and was continuing to have very strong contractions every minute. That was when my OB told me that the hospitalist was on service and she has experience with breech vaginal deliveries and asked if that was something I wanted to consider. I could barely focus on her words so she decided to get me my epidural and get me comfortable before we had any further conversation. As soon as I got my epidural she checked me again and I was 9 cms (that was about 30 minutes after the first time she checked me). I had to make my decision very quickly after having a brief but serious conversation with the hospitalist. I knew in my heart that this was the right decision for me. My husband was against it, but said he trusted me and my OB and knew that I was very aware of the risks associated with this type of delivery given my medical background.

So we moved into the OR, which is where I had to deliver in case they had to do an emergency c-section. As was explained to me before making my decision, I labored down for about an hour before I started pushing in order for the baby to optimally move into the birth canal vs pushing him into position. I pushed for 18 minutes until I heard the most beautiful sound in the world which was that of my baby crying. He was placed skin to skin with me and I just cried tears of joy and relief. He weighed exactly the same as my first son, which was 6 lbs 13 oz. I had no tears and felt so wonderful during my recovery. Every day I thought about how different my recovery would have been if I had a c-section.

On the way to the hospital when I was contracting so painfully I thought to myself, “Why did I wait so long to call my OB? I should have called this morning! This pain is so unbearable I could have avoided this if I hadn’t waited!” Afterwards, I was so thankful that I did wait to call, because my delivery experience would have been so different. Everything happened to just fall into place to make this all possible. The OB that I had such extensive conversations with was on service at the hospital so she knew my anxiety about having a c-section, the hospitalist who will do the breech vaginal delivery was on service, I was in spontaneous labor with contractions every minute with very fast cervical dilation, and my baby was tolerating the labor. Had any one of these factors been missing or different, I would have had a c-section. I absolutely love my birth story and I hope you enjoyed reading it!

Jacob meets his big brother.

Jacob meets his big brother.

 

 

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